Sue Ward Named UAMS Cancer Institute Volunteer of the Year

| As part of the Patient-and Family-Centered Care Lecture Series, Calvin Chou, M.D., Ph.D., FACH, will present “Civility Ninjas: Fostering Effective Colleague to Colleague Interactions” from noon to 1 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 3, 2018 in the I. Dodd Wilson Building, Room 115.

Dr. Chou’s book Communication RX: Transforming Healthcare Through Relationship-Centered Communication will be provided to 30 participants.

For additional information, click here.


The fall 2018 Community Scientist Academy graduates are (l-r): Christine Murrell, Karen Boone, NaKisha Holmes, Sherita Williams, Sarah Pilcher, Jerusha Wynn, Dr. Julia Chears-Young, Jay Young and Ferrin Lunestad.

The fall 2018 Community Scientist Academy graduates are (l-r): Christine Murrell, Karen Boone, NaKisha Holmes, Sherita Williams, Sarah Pilcher, Jerusha Wynn, Dr. Julia Chears-Young, Jay Young and Ferrin Lunestad.

| Researcher Tiffany Haynes, Ph.D., threw down the gauntlet for the 10 graduates of the UAMS Community Scientist Academy.

“You can’t stop here,” Haynes, assistant professor in the UAMS College of Public Health, said in her keynote speech. She urged the group at their Oct. 30 graduation to share their experience in the academy on social media to help spread the word. She advised them not to be shy about letting UAMS researchers know about their interests and the needs of their communities.

“Don’t wait to find out what research projects are going on at UAMS,” Haynes said. “You come and ask us, ‘What’s going on? How can I get involved?’ Whatever it is you’re passionate about, ask us. You are health champions; you’re on the front lines.”

Haynes got enthusiastic applause, and academy graduate Ferrin Lunestad of Hot Springs said afterward that the call to action resonated with her.

“I’d love to be a science advocate in my own hometown,” Lunestad said. “I have a 6-year-old, and I love the appeal that she made to look at our communities and see what’s needed in a science direction —  recommend research that needs to be done.”

The UAMS Translational Research Institute established the Community Scientist Academy in 2016 on the recommendation of its Community Advisory Board. Its purpose is to increase community understanding about the research process and offer research decision-making opportunities to communities, patients and other stakeholders. These opportunities include reviewing grants; advising on research projects; serving on community review boards, community advisory boards, and patient and family advisory councils; and assisting with ARresearch, the Translational Research Institute’s research participant registry.

Through five academies it has graduated 54 Arkansans from diverse communities and a variety of socioeconomic backgrounds.

Below is a sampling of comments other graduates made at the Oct. 30 graduation ceremony:

“I wanted to learn more about research because I previously had an injury and my mother died from breast cancer.” — Sherita Williams, Little Rock

“I was interested because I have been a research participant and I was interested in looking at the other side of it. I learned that a whole lot of work goes into research; it takes years.” — Christine Murrell, Little Rock

“I learned a lot from this class. There’s probably six or seven (volunteer participant opportunities) that I checked off the list that I would be interested in.” – J.A. Young, Little Rock


Turkey trivia

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Thanksgiving was proclaimed a national holiday in 1863 by then-President Abraham Lincoln. Presidents originally had to declare it a holiday every year. President Thomas Jefferson reportedly refused to do so because he strongly believed in the separation of church and state. Since Thanksgiving involved prayer, he thought making it a holiday would violate the First Amendment. According to the National Turkey Federation, 88 percent of Americans will be eating turkey this Thursday. The average weight of a turkey purchased for Thanksgiving is 16 pounds, meaning that approximately 736 million pounds of turkey will be consumed in the United States during Thanksgiving this year. Most Americans favor white meat, which makes up about 70 percent of the turkey and has less fat and fewer calories than dark meat. If you’re having turkey but watching your calories, you may want to skip the skin, which adds 35 calories to a typical 3.5 ounce serving.

Thoughts on thawing

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For those of you planning on cooking a turkey for Thanksgiving this week, it’s not too early to start thinking about the best way to prepare the poultry. If you choose to buy a frozen bird you may do so at any time, but make sure you have adequate storage space in your freezer. If you buy a fresh turkey, be sure you purchase it only one or two days before cooking. When it comes to thawing in the refrigerator, allow approximately 24 hours per 4 to 5 pounds of turkey. If you forget to thaw the turkey or don’t have room in the refrigerator for thawing, don’t panic. You can submerge the turkey in cold water and change the water every 30 minutes. Allow about 30 minutes defrosting time per pound of turkey. A turkey can be thawed in a microwave if it is not too large. Be sure to check the manufacturer’s instructions for the size turkey that will fit into your oven, the minutes per pound, and the power level to use. And cook it immediately after thawing.

The key ingredients

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Today is the day before Thanksgiving, a good time to make sure you have all of the key ingredients you need to prepare your holiday meal. Be sure you have all the equipment you will need, including a roasting pan large enough to hold your turkey and a food thermometer. Wet and dry stuffing ingredients can be prepared ahead of time and refrigerated separately. Mix the ingredients just before placing the stuffing inside the turkey or into a casserole dish. If you choose to stuff your turkey, stuff it loosely. The stuffing should be moist, not dry, since heat destroys bacteria more rapidly in a moist environment. Place the turkey in the oven immediately. The time it takes to cook the turkey varies anywhere from three to five hours, depending on its size, which is why a thermometer can come in handy. All turkey meat, including any that remains pink, is safe to eat as soon as all parts reach a minimum temperature of at least 165 degrees Fahrenheit.

A time for sharing

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Thanksgiving is a time for sharing, but one thing you don’t want to share is the bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses like staph infections or listeria. If you are having a holiday party this year, remember to always serve food on clean plates, not those previously holding raw meat and poultry. Otherwise, bacteria which may have been present in raw meat juices can cross contaminate the food to be served. If you are cooking foods ahead of time, be sure to cook them to safe minimum internal temperatures, somewhere between 145 and 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Foods should not sit at room temperature for more than two hours. Keep track of how long foods have been sitting on the buffet table and discard anything there two hours or more. Hot foods should be held at 140 degrees or warmer. Cold foods should be held at 40 degrees or colder. Keep foods cold by nesting dishes in bowls of ice. Otherwise, use small serving trays and replace them.

What to do with leftovers

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If you’re like many Americans and enjoying leftovers from yesterday’s Thanksgiving feast, here are some tips for safely serving your meals. Reheating a whole turkey is not recommended. If you plan to reheat a turkey, cut it into small pieces, although legs and wings may be left whole. Refrigerate stuffing and turkey separately in shallow containers within two hours of cooking. Reheat thoroughly to a temperature of 165 degrees Fahrenheit or until hot and steaming. Refrigerate potatoes, gravy, and vegetables in shallow containers and make sure that your storage devices are airtight so that your food will stay fresh. Leftovers can help you stretch your budget by providing the ingredients you will need for meals throughout the holiday weekend and beyond. Leftover turkey makes for great sandwiches and pot pie. A hambone is the perfect foundation for a great soup. Freeze what you won’t use in the next three days and enjoy the rest.

Trusted by thousands of listeners every week, T. Glenn Pait, M.D., began offering expert advice as the host of UAMS’ “Here’s to Your Health” program in 1996. Dr. Pait began working at UAMS in 1994 and has been practicing medicine for over 20 years.


| Science Café Little Rock, co-sponsored by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS), will hold its next public forum, Bones: Makem or Breakem, on Nov. 27. Panelists will explain how bones are formed, broken and repaired, as well as discuss factors that affect bone health and strength.

Science Café will be from 7-9 p.m. at Hibernia Irish Tavern, 9700 N. Rodney Parham Road. Science Café is a relaxed opportunity for monthly exchanges with various experts. No reservations are needed, but seating is limited. Admission is free.

This month’s panel will include Roy Morello, Ph.D., associate professor, UAMS Department of Physiology and Biophysics; Alex Biris, Ph.D., professor and director, University of Arkansas at Little Rock Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences; and Erin Mannen, Ph.D., assistant professor, UAMS Department of Orthopaedic Research.

Dorothy Graves, associate director for administration of the UAMS Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, will moderate the event. Science Café includes a corresponding live radio call-in program, “Science Café Little Rock,” on National Public Radio-affiliate station KUAR FM89. The science talk show, featuring one speaker from the monthly panel of scientists and experts, is aired just prior (6:05-6:30 p.m.) to the live Science Café event. Mannen is this month’s radio guest.

Science Café events are held on the fourth Tuesday of the month, except for July, August and December. Check out the website for more information on monthly speakers and topics at www.sciencecafelr.com. For more information on future Science Café events or to suggest topics and speakers, contact UAMS research liaison and Science Café Director Linda Williams, M.S., at 501-686-7418. To join the listserv and receive news on monthly speakers and events, send an email with “subscribe” in the subject field to sciencecafelr@gmail.com. Science Café was created through interest and partnership of the UAMS Graduate School, Arkansas Biosciences Institute, UAMS Division of Research, KUAR-FM 89.1, the Central Arkansas Section of the American Chemical Society and Hibernia Irish Tavern.



UAMS is the state’s only health sciences university, with colleges of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Health Professions and Public Health; a graduate school; hospital; northwest Arkansas regional campus; statewide network of regional centers; and six institutes: the Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute, Harvey & Bernice Jones Eye Institute, Psychiatric Research Institute, Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging and Translational Research Institute. It is the only adult Level 1 trauma center in the state. UAMS has 2,727 students, 822 medical residents and five dental residents. It is the state’s largest public employer with more than 10,000 employees, including 1,200 physicians who provide care to patients at UAMS, its regional campuses throughout the state, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, the VA Medical Center and Baptist Health. Visit www.uams.edu or www.uamshealth.com. Find us on FacebookTwitterYouTube or Instagram.

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| Please  provide your insight on and the readiness of UAMS for the new Vision 2028 strategy by visiting the web page at the following link and taking the UAMS strategy 2029 survey: www.surveymonkey.com/r/L5JVHQJ. The survey will close Dec.1.

UAMS has begun the process to create the vision and areas of focus for the next 10 years. This next strategic plan, a successor to the 2020 Vision plan, will encompass 2019-2029 — concluding on what will be the 150th anniversary of UAMS. It will include goals — and strategies to achieve those goals — across our clinical, academic and research missions.

 


| The Special Pets Offering Therapy (SPOT) Team dogs will visit with students and other UAMS Library patrons to provide stress relief during the holidays and end-of-the semester studying.

During the fall semester and in the Library located in Education Building II, the dogs and their handlers will visit:

Nov. 16: 2 p.m. – 3  p.m.
Nov. 28: 11 a.m. – noon
Nov. 29: 12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 30: 11 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Dec. 13: noon – 1:30 p.m.

 


Srinivas Ayyadevara, left, Robert Shmookler Reis and research associate Ramani Alla stop for a photo in their UAMS Donald W. Reynolds Institute lab.

Srinivas Ayyadevara, left, Robert Shmookler Reis and research associate Ramani Alla stop for a photo in their UAMS Donald W. Reynolds Institute lab.

| A team of University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) research scientists recently was awarded a $1.8 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to investigate common pathways that contribute to the aging of various tissues.

Robert Shmookler Reis, D. Phil, professor in the UAMS College of Medicine’s Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatrics, and Srinivas Ayyadevara, associate professor in same department, are the co-principal investigators leading the study. Co-investigators are Steve Barger, Ph.D., professor in the Departments of Geriatrics and Neurobiology & Developmental Sciences, and Alan Tackett, professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology.

The goal of the research is to identify what different neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease have in common with other age-progressive diseases and conditions such as heart disease, muscle wasting, kidney disease, and type 2 diabetes.

Protein aggregation — clustering or clumping of protein molecules — has long been recognized as a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

“We were the first ones to show that protein aggregation happens not just in the brain, but also in the heart, skeletal muscle and kidney with age and age-associated diseases,” Ayyadevara said.  Reis added, “The misfolding of proteins, which contributes to protein aggregation, is promoted by stress and inflammation, accumulating with age.”

Reis said the team has looked at protein aggregation for nearly a decade, funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs.  For the last two years, it has also been supported as part of a multi-investigator National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant led by Sue Griffin, Ph.D., professor and vice chair of research at the UAMS Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging.  Peter Crooks, Ph.D., D.Sc., chair and professor of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the UAMS College of Pharmacy, developed novel derivatives of anti-inflammatory drugs.

As part of the NIH grant, Crooks, Reis, Ayyadevara, and graduate student Samuel Kakraba tested these drugs for their ability to inhibit protein aggregation and to extend life. One drug, PNR502, was the main subject of a recently awarded patent covering several bioactive compounds.

“It not only inhibits further protein aggregation but even appears to reverse it,” Ayyadevara said. “Working with Dr. Barger, we will examine whether it can preserve youthful functions in the hearts and brains of normal mice, and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s.”

“We have shown that protein aggregation accompanies aging of all tissues, and probably contributes causally to most or all age-associated diseases,” said Reis. “This fundamental molecular process may underlie most of the deterioration that defines aging. It’s a Pandora’s box that holds all the things that go wrong as we get older, so it offers an unprecedented opportunity to finally understand how and why so many disparate factors contribute to aging.”



UAMS is the state’s only health sciences university, with colleges of Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Health Professions and Public Health; a graduate school; hospital; northwest Arkansas regional campus; statewide network of regional centers; and six institutes: the Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute, Jackson T. Stephens Spine & Neurosciences Institute, Harvey & Bernice Jones Eye Institute, Psychiatric Research Institute, Donald W. Reynolds Institute on Aging and Translational Research Institute. It is the only adult Level 1 trauma center in the state. UAMS has 2,727 students, 822 medical residents and five dental residents. It is the state’s largest public employer with more than 10,000 employees, including 1,200 physicians who provide care to patients at UAMS, its regional campuses throughout the state, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, the VA Medical Center and Baptist Health. Visit www.uams.edu or www.uamshealth.com. Find us on FacebookTwitterYouTube or Instagram.

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| The Arkansas Geriatric Education Collaborative at the Institute on Aging invites you to attend a free two-hour CE webinar, “Insomnia — A Golden Opportunity to Address Psychiatric Disorders” from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 5, in the Institute on Aging’s Jo Ellen Ford Auditorium.

Participants may attend in person, at a participating site including IVN, or by live streaming online at agec.uams.edu

Click here for more information on participating sites & CE Credit information.

Click here for the event flyer.


| This December marks the 26th year that the Miracle Star tree has lit up the Cancer Institute during the holidays. The tree has brightened
not only our building, but the spirits of the many patients who come through our doors each holiday season. We would like to invite you to be part of this wonderful tradition by sponsoring a star as a special holiday greeting or to pay tribute to a special person.

Each star is only $3.00 and all proceeds go to the Cancer Institute Patient Support Fund. Please supply us with a list of names and addresses for each star you wish to have placed on the tree. The acknowledgement card will be sent first class with your name to each person honored or to the family of the person remembered. If you prefer your cards to be emailed, please provide the recipients’ email addresses.

All orders must be postmarked or delivered to the Cancer Institute (room 111-2) by December 12th. Please use the forms below and on the back (for additional names, please attach another sheet of paper) and send with a check (made payable to UAMS/Cancer Institute Auxiliary) to
Miracle Star Project, Cancer Institute Volunteer Services, 4301 West Markham, #721-1, Little Rock, AR 72205. To download a form here. You may also email your list of names and addresses to SHHenry@uams.edu and cards will be mailed upon receipt of payment. For more information, call 501-686-8286.


| UAMS Administrative Guide policy number 15.1.5 prohibits any employee outside of Health Information Management (HIM) from accepting service of a subpoena for medical records (often known as a subpoena duces tecum). An employee of any other department, office, or division who attempts to represent that he or she has the authority to accept or otherwise accepts service of a subpoena addressed to “the custodian of records,” “records custodian,” “medical records department,” or any other similar title will be subject to discipline, up to and including termination.

If you are approached by an attorney, sheriff’s deputy, or process server attempting to serve a subpoena for medical records, make it clear that you do not have the authority to accept the papers, but that you can refer him or her to the appropriate department. Immediately direct the person to the HIM office on the ground floor of the Central Building. Questions may be referred to HIM at 603-1520 or to the Office of General Counsel at 686-7608.